wu wei

China’s Gen Zen

 

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Looks like Chinese millennials are equally apathetic as their western counterparts.  That’s according to China’s Global Times.

Rather than focus on capitalistic careers or communist-party dogma, China’s so-called Zen Generation is turning away from money and Mao and looking farther back in history, back to Buddha himself and his image of inner peace.

Sounds like these twentysomething Chinese are lacking a little Confucian structure.  They prefer to lounge around in Lao Tzu’s Tao, waiting for wu wei to woo them off the couch.

Actually, this bodes well for China’s future.  If she can detach from imported ideologies, if she can return to her own ancient wisdom, the rest of the world would be wise to follow.

 

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Happy Wu Wei, 2018

20171231_bridge mosaic

Out walking this afternoon, contemplating the bridge between this year and next, I spotted this image on the Mission Street bridge where it spans the 280 freeway…

Wu wei made me grab my phone and snap a shot…

Perfect to spot this scene on a bridge, this mosaic of worlds above and below, a pure white middle way between them, a bridge bordering both…

Always best to mind the middle, even in 2018…

 

DJT: Taoist Non-Confucian

Trump & Qin

A common complaint about Donald Trump is his brassy, raw demeanor:  his flip remarks and dismissive one-liners.

“He doesn’t act presidential,” some say.

That’s a very valid Confucian concern – the preference for clear and expected social roles.

Tweeting at 3am is not the expected behavior of a world leader.

Still, his unstoppable impetus, his surprising inner drive, illustrate the Taoist urge of wu wei — the authentic, the real, the very heart of a beating Tao.

Trump is simply more Taoist than Confucian.  Buddhists simply breathe.

 

Wabi Sabi Yo

 

In Zen-bending Japan, the idea of a “rustic, withered loneliness” turned romantic over time, adapting into an appreciation of flaws, a respect for spontaneous error.

American writer Ernest Hemingway urged fellow writers to imbue their characters with lots of flaws, the more the better; and the more real their characters seemed.

The Bible introduced a God willing to forgive our faults and flaws, someone to love us unconditionally, no matter our transgressions.

And the Japanese concept of wabi-sabi accepts the flaws in our efforts, appreciates them as examples of wu wei, as examples of unintended action, and then celebrates them — raising them to the level of art.