dalai lama

The Book of the Way

Tao te Ching

After seeing the Dalai Lama speak in 1989, I browsed the books for sale outside the university auditorium and first discovered the Tao te Ching.

That was Stephen Mitchell’s translation, and I took it home and read it,  bending like a stem to its soft humor and smiling guidance.

The 81 poems comprising the Tao provide a map to a spiritual territory, a land far from the pages of a book, closer perhaps to the heart of all our deeds.

Click the image above to get your own copy.  Then read it for yourself with a warm cup of tea.  Begin to grin as you slowly unravel its riddle…

 

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Dalai Lama Yo

 

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On October 5th, 1989, the Nobel Peace-Prize winner was announced —  his holiness, the Dalai Lama of Tibet.

That very night, I held a ticket to attend a lecture at UC Irvine, a lecture to be delivered by — his holiness, the Dalai Lama of Tibet.

During his talk, in response to an audience question, the Dalai Lama said something that struck me.

“If Dalai Lama mad at China,” the Dalai Lama said, “China feel no pain.  Only Dalai Lama feel pain.  Dalai Lama no eat.  Dalai Lama no sleep –“

Then, pausing momentarily to confer with his robed Tibetan translator, the Dalai Lama continued:   “Dalai Lama feel up tight.”